mental health

It’s easy to become isolated during this time. You’re tired and emotional. It’s important that you remain socially active and connect with others. You need to remember who you are as a person, not just a caregiver, and social interactions will help you feel human.

Recovery from depression is a complex process but you don’t need to go it alone. By surrounding yourself with friends and loved ones, you can continue to feel genuine connections, and each one of those connections is a light that can pierce through the darkness.

Exercise will produce chemicals in your brain that will help elevate your mood and decrease your stress or tension, which will provide some relief for your anxiety. Exercise will also help you sleep. Not only will the physical exertion improve the quality of your sleep, it will help insure you’re able to sleep without interruption.

Caregiver burnout happens when a person has become physically, emotionally, and mentally exhausted from the stress and burden of caring for a loved one. These people often feel completely alone, unsupported and unappreciated. Get someone in your corner and share your burden. This will help you breathe, feel better, and get your strength back.

Self-care is complex. Anyone can tell you to do it, but only you can bestow the gift of self-care onto yourself. A lack of self-care can lead to increased irritability. Leaving this unchecked can result in personal and professional relationships being negatively affected.

If you are a healthcare worker that is experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression as a result of COVID, it’s really important that you let someone else help you right now. A psychiatrist can offer strategies that will help you cope with your symptoms and deal with the underlying emotions.

Someone once said, “This too shall pass.” Life, like weather, has seasons. While you may feel stuck right now and like nothing is going the way you hoped or planned, recognize the truth, which is, this too shall pass. Transitions are just that, an uncomfortable bridge from one part of life to the next.

Taking a mental health day from work or school can be extremely important for your overall well-being. It can help you avoid burnout, improve your mood, help you get some much-needed rest, and rejuvenate you so you can tackle “real life” once again.

The emotions you experience during an episode of depression are created by negative thoughts and perceptions. If you eliminate distorted, negative thoughts, you will find it easier to cope with the negative event that triggered your depression.

We’ve all got to remember that we’ve faced a big trauma this past year and we must be gentle with ourselves. Life will feel normal once again. Until then, do the best you can do and ask for help when you need it.